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Colorful tiles on the roof of St. Stephen's Cathedral in Vienna

Vienna Media News 06/2018 2018 commemorative year


On November 12, 1918 the foundation of the First Austria Republic was settled in Parliament on the Ringstrasse (then under the name the Republic of German-Austria). More than 100,000 people gathered outside Parliament when the news broke. Almost twice as many congregated on Heldenplatz in front of the Hofburg on March 15, 1938 to hear Adolf Hitler’s speech proclaiming the annexation of Austria by Nazi Germany. In the same year the November progroms delivered an early indication of the horrific persecution that would be visited on the city’s Jewish population.

The high point of the commemorative year will be marked by the opening of the House of Austrian History on Heldenplatz on November 10, 2018. Its first temporary exhibition will look at the 100-year history of the democratic republic. Since March 12, 2018, the anniversary of Austria’s ‘Anschluss’ with Hitler’s Germany, a sound installation on Heldenplatz by Susan Philipsz entitled The Voices has been providing a reminder of the terrors of the time. It can be heard twice daily for 10 minutes at 12.30pm and 6.30pm.

There are also numerous temporary exhibitions to mark the commemorative year. In 2016, the Austrian Film archive announced that it had found the missing scenes from the 1924 Austrian silent film The City Without Jews. This film provides the historic backdrop for The City Without at the Metro Kulturhaus. Taking individual scenes as its starting point, the exhibition switches between the past and the present. It shows how mechanisms of social exclusion function, retracing the individual stages of the exclusion process from polarisation of society all the way to the eventual expulsion of the resulting scapegoats. This development is not only explained through the prism of the 1920s and 1930s in which anti-Semites demanded the expulsion of the Jews, but also looks at the present day agitation directed at immigrants, Muslims and refugees.

The Rupture and Continuity: the Fate of the Habsburg Legacy After 1918 exhibition at the Imperial Furniture Collection looks at the fate of the former imperial chattels and art collections after the fall of the monarchy in 1918. Selected objects reveal the fascinating historic background of the transfer of ownership into the hands of the new democratic republic.

  • House of Austrian History, opens Nov 10, 2018, Hofburg, Heldenplatz, 1010 Vienna, www.hdgoe.at
  • The City Without, until Dec 30, 2018, Metro Kinokulturhaus, Johannesgasse 4, 1010 Vienna, www.metrokino.at
  • Rupture and Continuity: the Fate of the Habsburg Legacy After 1918, Dec 5, 2018-Sep 30, 2019, Imperial Furniture Collection. Andreasgasse 7, 1070 Vienna, www.hofmobiliendepot.at
  • 2018 memorial year online: www.oesterreich100.at

Contact:

Vienna Tourist Board
Helena Hartlauer
Media Relations UK, USA, Canada, Australia
Tel. (+ 43 1) 211 14-364

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